E. Darwin Hartshorn: //Boilerplate

Devgame Internship 3: More Title Nonsense

So, my super clever idea for an intro is this:

You see the moon through branches.  Maybe it’s silent.  Maybe there’s a wolf howl and then silence.

The camera pans down and, meanwhile, the title fades in.

Now, to do this properly, we need to have layers, where each layer scrolls at a different rate.  So I’ve separated my title screen into layers, which I’m working on painting.

Layer 1: Moon and Stars.  This layer basically stays still.

L1

Adding in Layer 2: Mountains in the distance.  This layer moves very little.

L2

Adding in Layer 3: Krag Vargenstone itself.  This is the whole point of the reveal.  Also note it’s not finished yet.

L3

The Krag needs more contrast and more fine details on the painting, but it’s coming along nicely.

Now, at the size I need to work, my CPU and GPU are already choking.  My laptop, on the otherhand, has never even heard of processing power, let alone having any.  So, something simple, like animating an orc, or finishing the title font.

Font finished.

 

test

Devgame Internship 3: Title

Here’s my concept:

Title Rough

And here’s the ‘font’ I’ve created in Inkscape just now:

Font

Time to get ready for my day job.

I have a freaking awesome idea for the title screen, which I’m going to try to assemble on my lunch break at work today. Any progress will be added to this post when I get back.

… hours later…

Git wouldn’t let me push the repo onto GitLab and then pull it to my laptop, so I didn’t have anything to work on whilst on my breaks. Git is a git.

So I spent that time coming up with a way to make a quick and dirty Orcish.

  1. Transliterate English words into a set of nasty-wasty Orc-sounding phonemes. E.g “dwarf” → “dvorv”
  2. Invert the order of the phonemes.  “dvorv” → “vrovd”
  3. Clean up any awkward bits. “vrovd” → “vrov”
  4. Arrange words according to a grammar that is an unholy hybrid of Japanese and Cornish.

Here are some sample phrases:

“I smell a dwarf!” → “Dža vrov dremz!”

“Aren’t you a little short for a Red Claw?” → “Už tov Derválk trož ma xon?”

“This is not the dwarf you’re looking for.” → “Zyd tov už küd vrov matán.”

Like every pretentious fantasy language, there needs to be a liberal sprinkling of diacritical marks.  To quote R. L. McSterlingthong, “Everything is better with ümläüts.”

So, Git is being less of a git now.  Perhaps one day Git and I can establish a true rapport.

But, as of today, I have some material to use if I ever feel like spending an afternoon grunting into my microphone.